Tagged * Mind Hacks™

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How is the brain relevant in mental disorder?

By vaughanbell The Psychologist has a fascinating article on how neuroscience fits in to our understanding of mental illness and what practical benefit brain science has – in lieu of the fact that it currently doesn’t really help us a great deal in the clinic. It is full of useful ways of Read Full Article…

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Mind Hacks excerpts x 2

By tomstafford This month, Business Insider have republished a couple of chapters from Mind Hacks the book (in case you missed it, back before the blog, Mind Hacks was a book, 101 do-it-at-home psychology experiences). The excerpts are: 1. Why one of these puzzles is easy and the other is hard Read Full Article Here…

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Trauma is more complex than we think

By vaughanbell I’ve got an article in The Observer about how the official definition of trauma keeps changing and how the concept is discussed as if it were entirely intuitive and clear-cut, when it’s actually much more complex. I’ve become fascinated by how the concept of ‘trauma’ is used in public debate Read Full Article…

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Spike activity 06-03-2015

By vaughanbell Quick links from the past week in mind and brain news: The strange world of felt presences. Great piece in The Guardian. Nature reports that the Human Brain Project has voted for a change of leadership. But read carefully, it’s not clear how much will change in practice. Surely the worst Read Full…

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Radical embodied cognition: an interview with Andrew Wilson

By tomstafford The computational approach is the orthodoxy in psychological science. We try and understand the mind using the metaphors of information processing and the storage and retrieval of representations. These ideas are so common that it is easy to forget that there is any alternative. Andrew Wilson is on a mission Read Full Article…

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Fluctuating existence

By vaughanbell The Neurologist has a fascinating case report of a women with Parkinson’s disease who experienced a fluctuating belief that she didn’t exist. Cotard’s delusion is usually described as the ‘belief that you’re dead’ although Jules Cotard, for whom the delusion is named, defined it as a délire des négations Read Full Article Here…

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Downsides of being a convincing liar

By tomstafford People who take shortcuts can trick themselves into believing they are smarter than they are, says Tom Stafford, and it comes back to bite them. Honesty may be the best policy, but lying has its merits – even when we are deceiving ourselves. Numerous studies have shown that those who are Read Full…

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The scientist as problem solver

By tomstafford Start the week with one of the founding fathers of cognitive science: in ‘The scientist as problem solver‘, Herb Simon (1916-2001) gives a short retrospective of his scientific career. To tell the story of the research he has done, he advances a thesis: “The Scientist is a problem Read Full Article Here For…

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Actually, still no good explanation of ‘that dress’

By vaughanbell The last time I almost went blind staring at “that dress” was thanks to Liz Hurley and on this occasion I find myself equally unsatisfied. I’ll spare you the introduction about the amazing blue/black or white/gold dress. But what’s left me rather disappointed are the numerous ‘science of the dress’ Read Full Article…

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Spike activity 28-02-2015

By vaughanbell Quick links from the past week in mind and brain news: Nautilus magazine has a good piece on behavioural economics and rethinking ‘nudges’. Although the rethink is really just another form of standard ‘nudge’. The biggest hedge fund in the world, the $165 billion Bridgewater, starts an AI team to Read Full Article…

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